Gijega School Project

Gijega Primary School Project Gijega Primary School
Children enjoying
                fresh drinking. This project is completed. School children enjoying fresh drinking water

Phase 1: Supply Water to the School (COMPLETED)

Collected: $10,500

Goal $10,500

The first phase of the Gijega School Project was to bring clean drinking water to the school. This involved constructing a pipe to bring water to the school from a government storage tank two miles away. Before this pipeline was completed, villagers had to transport untreated water to the school by donkey or ox cart. The Rafiki Village Project purchased the materials and hired the water engineer that oversaw the project. The villagers supplied the labor required to dig a trench to bury the pipe. The school and community are delighted to now have clean drinking water.

Complete the housing for the teachers Partially constructed teachers’ housing at Gijega Primary School

Phase 2: Complete the Teacher Housing

Partially constructed teachers’ housing at Gijega Primary School

Early in 2017 construction will start on the teachers’ housing. In Tanzania isolated rural communities must supply housing in order to attract and retain teachers. This project was started several years ago but was halted mid-construction when government funding ran out. The lack of housing for teachers contributes to a teacher shortage as they now face a long commute to the school over often impassable roads from the nearest town. Gijega School currently has only 9 teachers for its 415 students. On-site housing should help make it possible to recruit more teachers and improve this ratio.

Gijega Primary School Classroom prior to renovation Gijega Primary School Classroom prior to renovation

Phase 3: Renovate the Gijega Primary School Classrooms

Phase three of the Gijega School Project will be the renovation of the classrooms. This will include painting and patching walls and floors, repairing broken windows, and replacing desks and chairs. An attractive and comfortable environment facilitates learning and instills pride in students. Furthermore, when parents feel pride in their community school they are more likely to send their children there, thus reducing truancy.

Classroom after renovation

Phase 4: Provide Learning Tools

The fourth stage of the Gijega School project will be to provide the schools with learning tools such as books, computers, art supplies, and other educational supplies. Efforts will also be made to recruit more qualified teachers for the school.

The final phase of the Gijega School project will be to support the community in its ongoing maintenance of the project. The goal is for the community to eventually be able to maintain the school and high educational standards without outside support. However, because Dumbeta’s economy is based on subsistence agriculture it is likely that the school will need continued financial support for years to come. The Rafiki Village Project plans to help the community to find ways to increase the school’s financial independence. This may involve projects aimed at improving agriculture efficiency and yield, granting micro loans to local households and businesses, and starting school programs aimed at teaching practical, entrepreneurial knowledge and skills that will give graduates a way to earn a living.

Continuing Support to the Gijega School

Phase 5: Provide Continuing Support to the Gijega School

The final phase of the Gijega School project will be to support the community in its ongoing maintenance of the project. The goal is for the community to eventually be able to maintain the school and high educational standards without outside support. However, because Gishaj’s economy is based on subsistence agriculture it is likely that the school will need continued financial support for years to come. The Rafiki Village Project plans to help the community to find ways to increase the school’s financial independence. This may involve projects aimed at improving agriculture efficiency and yield, granting micro loans to local households and businesses, and starting school programs aimed at teaching practical, entrepreneurial knowledge and skills that will give graduates a way to earn a living.